Green Government – Where Do We Stand?

Logo of Conservative Party UK

Green Government? Image via Wikipedia

After winning the 2010 election, the UK’s new government pledged to be the greenest ever.  So a year on where are we?

This week, the larger of the two parties forming the UK’s coalition government, the Conservative Party, held its annual party conference.  It didn’t start well for environmentalists when the Chancellor, George Osborne (the man who in 2009 said “If I become chancellor, the Treasury will become a green ally, not a foe”), revealed his plan that “We’re going to cut our carbon emissions no slower but also no faster than our fellow countries in Europe.”

The Transport Secretary, Philip Hammond, then revealed plans to increase the speed limit on British motorways to 80 miles per hour.  The government acknowledged soon after that this would lead to more pollution and increase the risk of road deaths.  I find this policy completely bonkers – aren’t governments there to protect the people, even from themselves?

Then we had  David Cameron, the Prime Minister, the man in charge with a clear vision for how to take the country forward.  His speech did not use the words ‘environment’, ‘carbon’ or ‘climate’ even once.  He said ‘green’ twice and, according to The Guardian, “both mentions of ‘green’ were in passing.  One was part of a wide-ranging blast by David Cameron at the [previous] Labour [government]’s failings. The other – ‘green engineering’ – also came as part of a list of technologies a new economy would be built on.”

So all in all not very promising.  The Guardian newspaper has been tracking the government’s progress using a Green-o-meter, and following the Conservative Party Conference, they dropped the needle from doing better than ‘middle of the road’ to doing worse, and I tend to agree.

There simply does not seem to be any fresh ideas coming from the government, with the same old rhetoric focussing always on GDP growth and short-sighted protectionism of established industries.  Andrew Simms in The Guardian asked Why protect BAE jobs when you can convert them to the green economy?  He argued against protecting jobs in the arms industry while setting out greater benefits that would arise from spending on houses, public transport and infrastructure.  I also think there must be a lot of talented engineers and other professionals in the arms industry whose skills could be put to more humane uses elsewhere.

And finally I also read this week about Niu Wenyuan, a senior economist and government adviser in China who is trying to promote the use of a ‘quality index’ which measures the economy not just by size, but by sustainability, social equality and ecological impact.  You might say that this would then give a truer sense of costs and benefits than relying on GDP alone as a measure of progress.  This seems like a great idea to me, and it may or may not take off in China, but I can’t see it being adopted in western democracies where our politicians can’t see past the next election and don’t seem to have the vision or courage to stray from the accepted way of doing things.

David Mitchell’s Soapbox

Comedian David Mitchell is doing a series of videos for the Guardian newspaper about a variety of topical subjects.  Two recent episodes have been on environmental topics.

In this first video, David talks about using market forces to drive sustainability, in focussing on the short shelf life of cheap modern goods and air travel.

In terms of my ‘smart sustainable home’, it has made me give some more thought to the issue of longevity of furniture, fixtures and fittings.

In this second video, David takes on climate change doubters.  He makes the point, in his inimitable style, that in addition to the scientific consensus that man-made climate change is happening, from a precautionary point of view we should tackle climate change because we aren’t sure it isn’t happening.  A very good line of argument indeed.

When confronted with climate change sceptics, I have always sought to broaden the argument to include other problems relating to burning fossil fuels.  For instance, carbon dioxide isn’t the only thing coming out of chimneys and car exhaust pipes.  Nitrogen oxides and particulate matter are proven to cause health problems.  So surely, making more efficient use of fossil fuels and switching to alternatives must be a good thing.

Fossil fuels will one day run out.  Already we are having to go to more remote locations to take advantage of more difficult-to-extract sources.  Some would even say that global politics and wars are ruled by the availability of oil.  This too suggests that making more efficient use of fossil fuels and switching to alternatives must be a good thing.

Finally, fossil fuels are increasingly expensive.  Using less not only is good for the environment, but is good for your pocket too.

The whole series of David Mitchell’s Soapbox videos can be found here.

smart sustainable home

what is a smart sustainable home?  there are clearly two aspects to this.  taking the smart part first, there is an emerging trend for integrating technology in the home, with lighting and media controls integrated and much, much more.  take a look at this video on bbc news for microsoft’s take on this.

what about a sustainable home?  this is something that has been growing steadily for years, particularly in the last decade with an increasing number of people improving their homes’ energy efficiency and even generating electricity at home.

to some, a smart sustainable home must sound counter-intuitive, and there are inevitably some conflicts.  more tech around the home must mean more energy use for one.  and then there are the other aspects of sustainability.  much tech is made in countries where abuse of labour is known to occur – look at the recent reports of abuse at factories supplying apple (i’m sure they’re not alone in this). economically there are also aspects to be considered, not least whether i can afford any of this!

so plenty of challenges ahead.  right now i’m trying to buy a house and i’ve got plans for that place which i will be looking into in this blog.